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Study Overview

Study Program(s): Doctor of Philosophy

Study Mode: Online

Study Level: Research Higher Degree

Study Campus: Online Study

Graduation Year: 2005

Donald Winiecki

Donald Winiecki

I am the Professor of Ethics and Morality in Professional Practice in the College of Engineering at Boise State University (USA) where I have a keen interest in inclusion, diversity and the influences and effects of social technologies in workplaces and society at large.

I am heavily involved in a project funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation to revolutionise engineering and computer science departments which involves the development and delivery of new curriculum, and assisting current Computer Science Faculty to incorporate instructional materials that promote inclusion, diversity and social justice in computer science education and professional practice.

My current research addresses the same area of study and presently focuses on ethical issues related to applications of machine learning and artificial intelligence. I have earned U.S. Library of Congress certification in the transcription of braille in order to better support students with visual impairments – I can now provide transcriptions of their instructional materials in braille.  I am currently in the process of earning certification in braille transcription of maths and science content using Nemeth code braille (a specialised format used in the United States).

My CQUni qualification has literally taken me around the world. When I undertook my PhD at CQU, I was an Associate Professor (analogous to Senior Lecturer in Australia) in the College of Engineering at Boise State University in the USA.  As a result of research productivity following completion of the PhD, I was promoted to Professor. I regularly present at domestic (USA) and international conferences and in addition to multiple publications in peer reviews journals, I have authored a book (`Discipline & Governmentality at Work`, Free Association Books, 2006).

I chose CQUni because I wanted an intensive, field-based research experience studying technologies in society that could be led by accomplished scholars and would result in earning a PhD. The faculty at CQU (principally, Dr Bert Wigman, Emeritus Fellow of the School of Psychology and Sociology) met and exceeded my expectations.

Recently I have regained contact with an artistic sense set aside many years ago. I have shown traditional oil and water media paintings, and computer-generated art in regional galleries. My computer generated art is accomplished not with specialised painting software, but by learning how to do programming, and then authoring my own software to draw and paint with relative autonomy.