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CQUniversity and Telstra to open outback data flows

CQUniversity and Telstra to open outback data flows

Published:06 September 2017

Leader of CQUniversity’s Precision Livestock Management team, Professor Dave Swain, said the use of sensors to measure livestock performance in remote areas could be enhanced via localised data processing.

A new research initiative between Telstra and CQUniversity will explore the interconnection of data systems within low-bandwidth remote locations.

Applicants are now being sought for the Telstra-sponsored scholarship to undertake postgraduate research at CQUniversity which explores ways to improve data processing and transfer in rural and remote livestock operations.

Leader of CQUniversity’s Precision Livestock Management team, Professor Dave Swain, said the use of sensors to measure livestock performance in remote areas could be enhanced via localised data processing.

“Connectivity is a major issue which livestock producers face when contemplating whether or not to adopt new farm management technologies, such as water sensors or walk-over weigh units, which can dramatically enhance farm productivity,” Professor Swain said.

“By processing the data from these sensors on site in the paddock, data transfer becomes significantly more efficient.

“This Telstra-funded postgraduate research project is aimed at developing a data system architecture that optimises power, communication and processing to ensure the right data is available at the right place and right time to deliver a profitable decision by livestock producers.”

Professor Swain said the wave of interest in ag-tech innovation meant the time was right for PhD researchers to partner with industry collaborators to engender confidence in the adoption of the next generation of digital technologies.

“The future of cattle production systems across the globe will involve increased use of information technology and communication infrastructure,” he said.

“Future technology solutions must be more refined and subtle, and use autonomous monitoring, communication and in some cases control systems. In so doing these systems will yield productivity, profitability, environmental and animal welfare benefits through more timely and precision management decisions.”

The successful PhD applicant will work as part of CQUniversity’s PLM team, providing them with a network of technology experts to help develop their knowledge and progress their career in agri-technology.

For more information and to apply go to www.cqu.edu.au/research/research-scholarships .