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Centre for Regional Economies and Supply Chains

CQUniversity’s Centre for Regional Economies and Supply Chains – or CRESC - combines the expertise of our leading researchers in issues focused on the development and enhancement of economic systems, the tourism industry and supply and value chains – all of which are vital to regional and rural communities.

Centre for Regional Economies and Supply Chains

Transcript

CQUniversity’s Centre for Regional Economies and Supply Chains combines the expertise of our leading researchers in issues focused on the development and enhancement of economic systems, the tourism industry, supply and value chains, all of which are vital to regional and rural communities.

Our vision at CRESC is to develop a world-class research centre that contributes to economic and business systems research and improves quality of life in regional Australia and beyond. We do this by working with a broad range of industry and research partners, state and local governments, and business and community organisations to generate new information and understand about developing and managing resources for the most beneficial regional outcomes. A key focus of CRESC is delivering on activities that will contribute to the continued growth and sustainability of Northern Australia.

Based in Rockhampton with researchers located all over the CQUniversity campus footprint, our Centre also works on international research collaborations, some of which have been undertaken in the UK, Europe, Asia, US, New Zealand and Canada to name only a few. CRESC research has a strong focus on the need to protect natural resources and we understand the importance of human capital, entrepreneurial thinking in regional communities, improving supply chains within and outside regional Australia and driving regional economies and future workforce needs. Some of the specific projects that are currently being undertaken at CRESC include a Situational Analysis of the horticulture sector across northern Australia, consumers’ preferences and willingness-to-pay for improved environmental standards of agricultural produce in the Great Barrier Reef catchments and a review of voluntary carbon standards for farmers.