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Research

The School of Business and Law conducts research in the areas of Accounting and Finance, Economics and Property, Tourism, Law, Management and Marketing.

Research and Research Higher Degree student supervision is concentrated in the following areas:

Accounting and Finance

The Accounting and Finance group conducts research in four main areas:

  • Financial reporting
  • Non-financial reporting, including corporate social reporting
  • Intellectual capital
  • Corporate governance

Active researchers in the Accounting and Finance group include:

Early career and emerging researchers include:

Current RHD students in the Accounting and Finance group include:

  • Farooq Butt
  • Hatem El Zein
  • Elizabeth Kassab
  • Jack Ly
  • Mohammed Samdani
  • Aswini Sukumaran
  • Salim Kalid
  • Paul Ongkili

Recent RHD graduates in the Accounting and Finance group include:

  • Junghoa Yang (PhD 2013)
  • Abdulhakim Abushhewa (PhD 2014)
  • Kazi Islam (PhD 2014)
  • Maria Tyler (PhD 2014)
  • Gerard Illot (PhD 2014)
  • Wan Zuraita Zakaria (PhD 2014)
  • Wessam Abughalia (PhD 2014)
Economics and Property

The Economics group conducts research in four main areas:

  • Environmental and Resource Economics, focusing in particular on valuing natural resources, the Great Barrier Reef, water quality, water policy, and recreation issues
  • Regional Development, including the impact of resource industries on regional areas, issues in human society in regional development, and regional health issues
  • Agricultural economics, including the beef sector and grazing land management in northern Australia, agricultural productivity trends, and consumer demands
  • Property and housing issues, focusing on issues relevant to regional communities
  • Tourism

Active researchers in the Economics group include:

Early career and emerging researchers include:

Current RHD students in the Economics group include:

  • Cheryl Bookallil
  • Daniel Gregg
  • James Harris
  • Juliana McCosker
  • Liakat Ali
  • Linhua Wu
  • Rebecca Gowen

Recent RHD graduates in the Economics group include:

  • Megan Star (PhD 2014)
  • Cheryl Bookallil (Masters 2014)
  • Lorraine Thorton (Masters 2014)

Tourism is lead by:

Early career and emerging researchers include:

Law

The Law group conducts research in four main areas:

  • Intellectual property
  • Information technology law
  • Media law
  • Online learning

Active researchers in the Law group include:

Early career and emerging researchers include:

Current RHD students in the Law group include:

  • None at this stage

Recent RHD graduates in the Law group include:

  • None at this stage
Management

The Management group conducts research in four main areas:

  • Human resource management, including the impacts and management of shift work practices
  • Entrepreneurship and Innovation
  • Operations strategy
  • Management in public and not-for-profit sectors

Active researchers in the Management group include:

Early career and emerging researchers include:

Current RHD students in the Management group include:

  • Tage Andersson
  • Priyantha Mudiyanselage
  • Craig Brown
  • Phil Craigie
  • Kimberley Nichles
  • Paul Ongkili
  • Syed Mohiuddin

Recent RHD graduates in the Management group include:

  • Louise Hawkins-Waters (PhD 2014)
Marketing

The Marketing group conducts research in four main areas:

  • Service quality
  • Consumer behaviour
  • Product marketing, particularly of food and agricultural products

Active researchers in the Marketing group include:

Early career and emerging researchers include:

Current RHD students in the Marketing group include:

  • Al-Sadat Ahmed
  • Akram Aljazzazi
  • Joowon Ban
  • Pawan Chugh
  • Carolyn Daniels
  • David Harris
  • Bronwyn McFarlane
  • Hari Pathak
  • Irina Pavlyuk

Recent RHD graduates in the Marketing group include:

  • Nil
Research Report

Achieving Secure and Stable Migrant Employment: A Study of Agriculture, Manufacturing and Food Processing in Regional Queensland

Regional Australia is a major contributor to Australia’s economy, producing approximately two-thirds of the nation’s export earnings (RAI, 2015a). Currently, skill shortages exist in some regional Australian industries such as agriculture, manufacturing and food/meat processing. In the past decade, the Australian government has encouraged permanent and temporary migrants to settle and work in regional Australia. Lobbying by employers and industry bodies to simplify the process for employing temporary migrants has occurred against a background of significant unemployment among permanent migrants. There is also a common view among employers, industry peak bodies, government departments and other key stakeholders interviewed that there are significant social and economic benefits of having permanent migrants in regional industries. Despite this, we identified certain barriers to migrants settling and working in regional areas. Based on the findings, recommendations are made in regard to the following areas: promoting regional communities; enhancing stakeholder communication; providing government incentives for employers and for migrants in the regional areas; employment; skills recognition; training and upskilling of permanent migrants; direct settlement of migrants in regional areas; infrastructure development; community capacity building in regional areas, and reinvigorating effective practices for alleviating skill shortages in agribusiness in regional Queensland.

This pilot report from the Centre for Tourism and Regional Opportunities (CTRO) in the School of Business and Law at CQUniversity was launched in December 2018 by Minister for Multicultural Affairs Stirling Hinchliffe at CQUni’s Brisbane Campus.